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Decision making

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  • 17 Aug 2017

    Everything else is just noise

    Thinking clearly under pressure was one of Sir Clive Woodward’s favourite mantras as coach of England’s 2003 Rugby World Cup-winning side. In order to ensure his players were able to make the right calls when the heat was on, Woodward sought to recreate pressurised scenarios so that his team had already practised the thought processes […]

  • 31 May 2017

    The importance of self-awareness

    In a recent article for The Guardian, Oliver Burkeman reported on some of the work being done by Tasha Eurich, an organisational psychologist, author and expert on the subject of self-awareness.
    According to Eurich, 95% of people think they’re self-aware but only 10-15% of us really are. If we’re not self-aware then we only have a […]

  • 22 Sep 2016

    The scarcity trap

    Oliver Burkeman is Busy, the eponymous journalist’s recent Radio Four miniseries on the subject of busyness, has provided a number of insights into how difficult it can be to manage our time amidst the distractions of modern life.

    In one of the episodes, Eldar Shafir, Professor of Psychology at the University of Princeton, talks about a […]

  • 25 Feb 2016

    In defence of decisions

    Decision-making in football is a thankless task. Such is the diversity of opinion that even sensible action – selling an ageing player for example – is likely to attract the ire of some. Media narrative is often deliberately contrarian and fans can be passionate beyond reason. Inaction, no matter how sensible or justified, can also […]

  • 18 Feb 2016

    The unknown truth

    Arguably the story of the season across European football is the rise of Leicester City. After winning 41 points in 2014-15, they’re on course for more than 70 this season and remain in the running for the league title.Leicester are a clear case of a team that is knowingly better
  • 17 Nov 2015

    12 Angry Men

    The 1957 classic film 12 Angry Men tells the story of a diverse group of jurors as they deliberate the guilt or acquittal of a young defendant whose life is in the balance having allegedly murdered his father. The jury are all male, mostly middle-aged, white, and generally of middle-class status, yet have very different personalities and character traits - some more assertive, others more subservient; some driven by facts, others by feelings. The movie is set almost exclusively inside the jury room and the twelve jurors must come to a unanimous decision beyond reasonable doubt about the defendant.
  • 22 Aug 2014

    “Molti duce, una voce”

    I've previously written about the weaknesses of the manager dominated transfer strategy traditionally followed by most English clubs.  But, whilst a diverse range of voices will help a club to more often make good decisions, it is equally true that once a decision has been made, the club must speak with one voice in its implementation.